Killing in cold blood

Reading Knappster today ("Surf Naked for Jesus" why did you change that?) Ran across his entry on the 1000th death penalty victim. I don't shed tears for murderers, whether they work for themselves or the state, but I do have one point I'd like to make.

The quote is:
"For some reason, apart from my general opposition to capital punishment (which pretty much comes down to "I can't trust politicians to deliver mail on time; why the hell would I trust them to decide who needs killin'?"), I didn't find "Tookie's" case exceptionally compelling. Maybe if I'd studied the case more closely I would have, but I let it go by because ... well, pretty much because a lot of people more prominent, more educated in the facts of the case and more interested had already taken it up. So. Anyway. Another state-sanctioned killing under the bridge."
(emphasis added)

I can define my opposition to the death penalty quite easily. The government should not be allowed to do anything that individuals within the society are not allowed to do. Killing in self defense is allowed, and cops and prison guards should be armed (and forgiven) for actions taken in 'self defense' of themselves and 'society'.

But, I have a hard time believing that an unarmed prisoner strapped to a gurney (or a chair, depending on your states murder predilection) presents any kind of a threat. And the killing of that person can only be counted as murder, making us no better than the murderer that we have exacted justice upon.

Life imprisonment without the possibility of parole is preferable, in my opinion, than making myself party to murder; even if the man that we are killing "needed it".




Mea culpa review 2017. I know I'm not a libertarian anymore because I feel no need to utter the word state when I mean government. When you need special words to describe the thing you hate, so that people like you can understand what you mean, you have started down the road to mass hallucination. However, the subject of killing in cold blood remains largely the same for me as it was back in the 90's when I convinced myself I was a libertarian.

I believed in the death penalty as a child, I took the pro-death penalty side in our high school debate team. We patted ourselves on the back for discovering the pat notion that beyond a shadow of a doubt meant the convicted were guilty. As a child I knew everything and it was certain. What a comfort it was then, absolute certainty of truth. That kind of thinking went out the window for me with my health. I know so little now, it is a wonder that I find the certainty to set words to paper.

When I realized that people were fallible, that government was frequently in error, that majority opinion had no more connection to reality than the flipping of a coin, I backed away from believing that we were ever going to be smart enough to know who really needs killing. I have a challenge for those who hold fast to the belief that the death penalty is right and good. Listen to this podcast about people who are present at hundreds of executions, and then imagine yourself in their shoes, if you can.

For me, I recognize hell when I hear it described. I can hear eternal torment in every voice that speaks, especially the ones that say how much they believe in the death penalty still. I would not willingly stand in any of their shoes even for one execution. 

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