Beyond the Da Vinci Code

I read the Da Vinci Code; I thought it was a good bit of fiction, a gripping who-done-it with a clever twist at the end, as good as any of the mystery writers that I've enjoyed over the years, with just that bit of 'what if' that stirs the mental soup even when you've finished reading it.

I'd like to stress the word fiction again, just for those jumpy christian types who keep thinking that it is possible to disprove something that is published as fiction.

Seriously, three hours, and counting, of material on the "History Channel" (which gets confounded sometimes as to whether it's actually supposed to be the PTL or the militarism channel) attempting to prove that a work of fiction is in fact, fiction.

"Yeah, it's says it right on the spine of the book, thanks for caring, though."

Not that they didn't have some interesting sources during the course of the three hours. Sources that lent more credence to the thought that the story was a bit more than fiction, than to the blatant attempt to discredit the book as, once again, fiction.

So, just for grins, here are the sources:

Dr. Deirdre Good - General Theological Seminary
Dr. Karen Ralls - The Templars and the Grail
Richard Leigh - Holy Blood, Holy Grail
Timothy Freke - The Jesus Mysteries
Margaret Starbird - The Woman with the Alabaster Jar

A heartfelt encouragement of 'good reading' I give to you all. May you find it as intriguing as I found the History channel programs frustrating, with the exception of the insights from the sources listed above.

People should question their most firmly held beliefs. Every day. If your beliefs cannot withstand your own questioning, then are they really your beliefs?

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