The Passing of an Age

Leonard Nimoy's death represents a figurative passing of an age in a way that so many other's deaths cannot.  When I heard of Robin Williams death at his own hands a few months back, I burst immediately into tears.  It was such a shocking event, it was so hard to imagine a man who was so alive being able to take his own life like that. I was prepared for the news of Leonard's passing because of his announcement of suffering from COPD.

To be honest about this subject (which is what I try to be on the blog) his star was tarnished for me when he agreed to appear in the Abramanation. Had he died before 2009 I would have mourned his loss as heavily as the Wife did. She adored the man and his works in ways that made me look like a  passing fancier. I couldn't possibly compete with her devotion to him and Star Trek fandom in general. I've never felt that strongly about much of anything aside from architecture and archeology. I was and am so conflicted about this subject that I started this entry to commemorate Leonard's death a week after he died, and then didn't finish it until two and a half years later (the date I'm typing this at now) I thought at the time let's see what the effect of his death is before making a big deal about it, but in my heart I just couldn't speak ill of the dead so soon after their passing. So I left the paragraph above sitting all that time, and refused to delete it when I scrolled past it for two years running.

So I'm finishing it now.

I said in 2009,
I can't help but wonder what Leonard Nimoy (whom I will hold blameless) saw in this film to recommend his tacit approval and his venerable image to it. Spock prime stands in sharp contrast to the new cast, carrying with him into history a mantle of respect this revisioined Star Trek will never achieve. Because unlike Star Trek and it's 42 years of history, the Abramanation is just entertainment.
 But I'm pretty sure what he saw was money. And why not? He'd never gotten the wealth or admiration he deserved from Hollywood or his peers. Never received the acknowledgement for creating a character so adored by people everywhere that even today, fifty years later, few actors can even come close to achieving. Every attempt at a portrayal of the emotionless Vulcans Gene Roddenberry originally envisioned looks silly compared to Leonard Nimoy's Spock. Writers don't even know how to write those kinds of characters, as exampled by every single series since Gene's death. Stories in which Vulcan society is morphed into some kind of vindictive hellhole that looks a lot like humans trying to paint an alien world devoid of emotion, and failing at it spectacularly. I've read a lot of Star Trek novels over the years, few of them come close to imagining the kinds of Vulcan that I saw hinted at in Gene's canon.

The problem is that the world went somewhere else between 1967 and today than where it went in the future that Gene painted back then. Emotionlessness has become synonymous with sociopathy, with dark plottings of revenge, as if T'Pring was actually representational of all of Vulcan. Never mind that revenge is an emotion, too. We are so bathed in emotion as human beings we don't even know what it is to not have them; which is the genius of Nimoy's portrayal.

On the positive side of future history departing from Gene's vision, we didn't destroy ourselves with eugenics wars in the 1990's; on the negative side, we can't seem to recognize the ghost of eugenics when it raises it's ugly head and calls all Mexicans rapists. On the even more negative side, we still don't have a moon colony much less warp technology and transporters, which were always trappings of story-telling and not actual predictions of future technology. But not having a Moon colony yet? That's just blind human stupidity. There is absolutely no reason for that not happening aside from our inability to see our own impending doom.

Like a man happily puffing away on a cigarette for most of his life never realizing that he's destroying his own life-support mechanism and bringing a too early end to his own life in the process, humanity doesn't realize that all life on this little ball of mud can be snuffed out in an instant. Nature doesn't care about our petty little problems. The pale blue dot can be wiped away in an instant by some minor space collision or other, and the universe would never notice. Not even an artifact of humanity left over aside from a couple of probes we've managed to send beyond the influence of our sun. Is that our future?

I really hope it isn't. 

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