Can't Do a Western Top Ten Either

David Gerrold requested a quick list of Westerns the other day. I immediately fired off a quick list of ten films that fit the bill in random order;
Silverado, Two Mules for Sister Sarah, The Outlaw Josey Wales, True Grit, The Sons of Katie Elder, Unforgiven, McClintock, Dances With Wolves, Tombstone (with Kurt Russell), The Cowboys, Young Guns, 3:10 to Yuma which was the last western I watched.
But as you can see, I can't count.

Not only can I not count, but I left off at least a dozen films that I know are better than the ones I put on it. I know that, because I read back through the hundreds of posts and kicked myself for not putting them on the list.

For starters, I've been doing a Netflix Clint Eastwood retrospective. Not exhaustive, just felt like I wanted to see some of his films I enjoyed back in the 70's and 80's and hadn't seen since. The son wanted to watch Dirty Harry, so we've made our way through all five of them and now we're about to start the spaghetti westerns. His middle work, the westerns that followed Sergio Leone's films, those I'm just going to add to the home library, which is why I kicked myself for not including Pale Rider or High Plains Drifter, just to name the next two films I'm planning on buying.

But that's just to name what is going on in my head right now.

I completely forgot I watched The Hateful Eight quite recently, and that is damn annoying because it was such an excellent tribute to the vanishing art of super 70 wide screen films. It was good too. Not as good as 3:10 to Yuma which I own and did remember. Not even as good as Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino's previous film.  I've seen all of Quentin Tarantino's work, it is all worth watching if just for the experience. There is a reverence for the art of filmmaking in his films that you can't find anywhere else.

I also forgot The Revenant along with the 60's original Man in the Wilderness (h/t to Jim Wright) both based on the true story of Hugh Glass, and if you don't know that name, you have some really interesting reading to do over the next few hours.

But again, that is just scratching the surface. Reading back through the other comments reminded me of Little Big Man which I haven't see recently but remember fondly. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, a mainstay of my childhood that held up well the last time I watched it. Many mentions of Shane. I hate to admit to the cardinal sin of never having watched Shane, but I guess I can always atone for it by watching it soon. So I will.

I just barely scratched the surface of the impact that John Wayne had on my young life. I literally didn't even have to think to name three films of his that I rated top ten. I could have done all ten as John Wayne films and still had some left over. I remembered True Grit because I saw the remake recently. Really can't watch the John Wayne version without watching the unofficial sequel Rooster Cogburn. Really can't watch McClintock without watching its unofficial sequel Big JakeThe Man Who Shot Liberty Valance had the most mentions, but I think The Shootist is the most memorable of all his films because he was already dying of cancer when he made it.

High Noon had the most mentions of any film (rough count) but truthfully I didn't find it that memorable. I mean, I've seen it. I don't recall anything about it. I don't think I'm a Gary Cooper fan, to tell you the truth. I remember more about the movie tribute to the TV series Maverick than I do about that film. Both the series and the film are worth watching just for the experience, but then I grew up watching The Rockford Files so go figure.

For the many people who recommended Magnificent Seven (or the more recent remake that is on my list to see) I suggest you watch the original. No, not the 60's American film which was so popular they made a sequel and a series. No, I'm talking about Seven Samurai by Akira Kurosawa.  I've seen three or four of his films and I have not been disappointed by any of them. Fair warning, be prepared to read subtitles.

Finally I suggest Cowboys & Aliens because, why not? You have cowboys and they are fighting aliens. What could you possibly hate about this film? Just joking, save your criticism, I'm well aware of its failings having seen it four or five times. It is one of the Wife's favorite films, and it really is quite good once you've seen it a few times.  This from the guy whose favorite episode of recent Doctor who featured Cowboys & Aliens, just different ones. Episode title A Town Called Mercy. Give it a try.

Weirdest film I've run across in reply to David Gerrold's hive mind query? Well, weirdest film that could be called a western anyway? Zachariah. Just watch the trailer. If you can that is. I couldn't, but I'm going to try to watch the film.

So as you can see, I can't do just ten, and I'll be kicking myself for forgetting something that just has to be part of this list the minute I hit the publish button.  Such is my life. 

4 comments:

  1. The thing about the Cowboys and Aliens (which does qualify technically) is that you'd also have to include Serenity although I admit that the MOVIE doesn't have any horses. Hmm.. what a puzzler

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    1. Successful test comment. =D you forgot to mention the thing you wanted ot point out when you said "I can't comment on this post".

      The changing horse in Silverado that disqualifies it as a good western. We'll try not to talk about Big Jake's changing dog though...

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  2. Thanks for the list. So many cowboy movies to see! I'm tempted to watch Zachariah with a bunch of friends who like to group-watch bad movies, but I'm afraid it might not be the right kind of bad movie.

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    1. The little I have seen makes me believe I'm going to need more than one glass of refreshment during the film.

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